Bits & Pieces (9/11/12)

September 11, 2012 — Leave a comment

 

  • Hide and Seek - “In fact, God is often found in one of the last places we think of—the church. At its best, the church retells the story of God speaking across the ages and definitively in Jesus Christ through the preaching of the gospel. But the church can also create community where God may be encountered in the faces of others as a result of the empowering Holy Spirit.”



  • The Little Things - “The danger of having the mentality that marriage is for holiness rather than happiness is that we can idealize what a life of holiness is like. We can get this idea that as a couple we are going to do great things for God and that our lives are going to be beautifully poured out in His service. We tend to forget that righteousness is often built by the daily mundane things of life: doing the dishes with a hardworking and joyful attitude, picking up the kids from practice, buying groceries, making time for each other in a busy world. Holiness takes sacrifice. Holiness takes a whole lot of boring routine. Now don’t get me wrong, it is totally worth it and is completely fulfilling. But it takes lots of work.”


  • True Holiness Befriends Sinners - “The power to clearly and explicitly share the gospel, and to gently but firmly call for change, won’t come from the worldly desire to nestle up to sin. It must come from holiness, true holiness.”



  • Keep It Complicated - “Our world is complex, and people know it. In fact, people love it. They reject (rightly, I believe) simplistic answers to complex questions because those answers haven’t worked. Formulas haven’t helped them make relationships work. Short explanations haven’t helped them grapple with long problems. And the people who insist, “it’s really quite simple” seem to be out of touch with reality.”


  • Christian Character & Good Arguments - Michael Horton wrote a paper for his seminary students on formulating and conveying good arguments. It’s worth reading if you engage in any type of public discourse.

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