The Reservation Book of Zion

November 17, 2007 — Leave a comment

I’ve been to my fair share of hotels. Although I don’t qualify as a road warrior, my work calls me to different cities on a somewhat regular basis and I like to travel. Funnily, I rarely seem to go to the same place twice, which means I get to experience a variety of different hotel environments. Each one has its own character and its own sense of purpose.

In all my travels there has only been one time when I’ve had a problem with my reservation. It was at a conference and the hotel clerk shared that the person who had previously occupied my room was still there and so there were no room available. Apparently, they weren’t allowed to tell the first occupier that the room was no longer theirs, instead I had to move to a hotel down the street. Just as in the classic Seinfeld episode, it made me question the power of the reservation. After all, if the reservation was quickly overturned by another guest’s extended visit, it didn’t do me a whole lot of good.

All of this was brought to mind recently when my pastor preached on Hebrews 12:18-24. The passage contrasts the Israelites experience on Mount Sinai with the place of our future God encounter – Mount Zion. As my pastor articulated unlike Mount Sinai, Mount Zion is a place where we can interact with God. It’s a place of community – a city is being built there. It’s a place of celebration – reconciliation is complete. And the wonderful thing about Zion is that God has His very own reservation book. All who believed have a confirmed booking, “their names are written in heaven” (vs. 23). And the best part is, we aren’t registered as visitors, spectators who are passing through. We become Zion’s citizens with all the rights and privileges therein.

Both Seinfeld and I may know what its like to have a worthless reservation. I’m glad that my final reservation is secured.

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